Usage


How to get your chainsaw started

Believe it or not, but “how do I start a chainsaw?” is a common question (or at least a frequent Google search) amongst chainsaw users. In this guide we’ve put together some tips on how to get your saw ready to perform.

There are two correct ways to start your chainsaw: on the ground or with the saw between your legs. No matter which starting method you choose, remember that the chain brake should always be activated. Many chainsaw models can be started in what is known as the half-throttle position. If the brake is not activated when starting one of these models, the chain may rotate.

Starting a cold engine

1. Activate the chain brake.
2. If the model is equipped with a decompression control – press this.
3. Activate the choke. If the saw is equipped with Air Purge/fuel pump, press the bulb a few times until the fuel is visible inside it and thereby enters the carburettor.
4. Starting on the ground: Put your right foot in the rear handle and keep a firm grip on the front handle with your left hand. Starting with the saw between your legs: Place the rear handle between your thighs and behind your right knee. Hold the front handle firmly with your left hand.
5. Pull the starter handle with your right hand. Repeat until the engine fires. Push the choke (half-throttle) and pull until the saw starts.
6. Accelerate so that the engine idles and then release the chain brake.

Starting a hot engine

When the engine is hot, it’ll start without the choke. Follow the instructions above, but disregard the points relating to the choke. If the engine is difficult to start, apply half-throttle. You access the half-throttle function by first fully activating the choke, then moving the control back.

Related articles

  • 570
    Forest

    How to use a chainsaw in cold weather

    Working with chainsaws during winter can be challenging. Here are some tips on what you can do to stay safe and productive when it gets cold outside.

  • Working with chainsaws part 1
    Forest

    Limbing thick branches

    A different work technique is used for limbing thick branches than that used for thin branches. This applies to leaf trees and other trees with thick, extensive branches. The working technique often matches the technique used for crosscutting. In order to avoid splitting and the guide bar pinching, it is important that you use the correct technique and sequence.

  • Working with chainsaws part 1
    Forest

    Crosscutting

    Consider the crosscutting carefully, especially for larger logs. An incorrect work technique can be dangerous and cause the trunk to split or the guide bar to become pinched. First assess the tension in the trunk. Make it a habit to look at how the trunk reacts to being cut. You may have misjudged the tension.