Husqvarna DRT900

One of the few dual rotating tillers on the market, the Husqvarna DRT900 offers the advantages of both a forward rotating cultivator and counter rotating deep soil tiller. The 9.0 gross torque engine is powerful and able to handle the conditions a homeowner might experience. The DRT900 has a sealed transmission for long life and a sturdy frame.

Briggs & Stratton, 900 OHV Series, 9 lb-ft, 17 inch

from

$ 749.95

Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price*

Features for DRT900

  • For safe and sturdy operation. The counterweight increases weight on the wheels and improves balance.

  • One gear forward and one reverse, for easy operation, maneuverability and transport.

  • Heavy treads provide better grip in cultivated and muddy soil.

  • Easy-adjust drag bar, for balance in different working conditions.

More features

  • Reverse gearbox
  • OHV Engine

Product reviews for DRT900

Husqvarna DRT900 4.3 5 31 31
transmission cannot be repaired bought a brand new tiller, starts great, but hard to shift. took it in for adjustments after 8 uses and was told it cannot be fixed and because the warranty ran out, I'm out of luck! April 13, 2014
dual rotating tiller Very good tiller, with the dual rotation one can work both packed and loose ground. The shifting mechanics leave some to be desired as gears are not easily changed. The power and traction are great as is the ability to widen the stance if need be. All in all a great machine, though over priced. November 2, 2013
I Love the features it provides. I Love how the tiller digs deep and tills the soil loose. It runs a great deal better than my other tiller. I Love the electric start on the tiller. The tiller really surprised me with its great features and ease of handking. October 24, 2013
DRT900 Having only used it for about two hours, I'm relatively pleased with it. However, comma, I rear many reviews on it ere purchasing and it appears Husqvarna isn't listening enough to correct the transmission shifting issue. Overall it's a nice unit though. July 3, 2013
Very powerful tiller This is the second year we've had this tiller, and it's been working great. I've only had two repairs on it, both of which were my fault. The first one was because we left it way too long without using it, (8 months) and it had gas in it, so we messed up the carburetor, so we had to take that in to take it fixed. The other repair that we needed was when I was rototilling in a rocky area, and the thing sucked up a very large rock, and bent a couple of pieces in the tine cover, so the blades could not spin. I disassembled the tine cover, bent the metal pieces back together, and assembled it. It did take more muscle than what would have been reasonable, though. As for the performance, this thing is amazing. It will tear up any kind of soil with ease. And even with its power, it has very minimal noise. You don't need to operate with earplugs or head phones because of the quiet engine and the exhaust facing away from you. I do have a couple of negative things to say about this. When you shift it in to transport, it goes way too slow, about 1/2 of walking pace. Also, you really need to wrestle the transmission to get it to go in the spot that you want it to. One last thing I have to say, is that when you're on asphalt, it probably has about a 100-ft turning radius. It's very hard to turn without tipping it on one wheel, and pivoting on that. Overall, this is probably the best rototiller out there, with amazing power, and tilling/cultivating ability. It has some drawbacks, such as slow transport speed, and temperamental transmission. If you're wondering what rototiller to buy, buy this one. June 17, 2013
Amazing tilling but has pulley issues From the beginning, I was very impressed with the power, speed, and performance of the tiller. It truly devoured the dirt clogs in my garden. The issues I had began the second time I was tilling the garden. In the middle of the tilling process all the power and mobility stopped. At first I thought the belt broke, but once I took the belt cover off I realized the belt had jumped off the pulleys. Simple fix, so I thought. As I went to place the belt on the front crankcase pulley, the pulley fell off in my hand. The key in the pulley wasn't sheared...the pulley just came off. I went to replace the pulley and then the belt using the owners manual, unfortunately the manual does not illustrate the proper routing of the belt around the belt guide pins. The other issues I've had were: 1) the manual said oil was already added, yet there was a tag on the tiller stating that no oil was added...so we purchased the oil needed...the owners manual was correct. 2) the ergonomics of the engagement lever are very poor...it becomes very difficult to hold the handle down after a hour of tilling. On the good side, the fuel consumption is amazing...absolutely amazing. June 8, 2013
Poor design on gear shifter I bought a CRT 900 in March of 2013. I own Husqvarna Yard Tractor. Leaf Blower, Chainsaw, & Weedeater, but will nerver buy Husqvarna again. You have to fight the shifter to get it in gear. This is now the month of May & I have had to take the digger back to dealership twice because of sheered pins on shifter. They tell me the one I bought is the only one they have had a problem with. I think if this is the only lemon that Husqvarna has made they should replace it with a good digger. The digger does a super job when you can get it in gear.The dealership says they can do nothing because they don't know how to fix it. They tell me to bounce the digger a little & try to get it in gear again. I am 66 years old & not able to bounce something that weighs more than I do. I also live on a fixed income & am not able to spend my money on something that does not work, but I guess I did this time. I would not reccomend this digger or any Husqvarna product to my worst enemy. May 31, 2013
DRT 900H - 99.99% Satisfied Was considering the Husqvarna DRT-900H and the Cub Cadet RT-65H. Both come with a Honda engine. The Husqvarna has a Honda GC-160 engine, 17" tilling width, 13" tires, and a 2-year warranty where as the Cub Cadet has a Honda GC-190 engine, 18" tilling width, 16" tires, and a 3-year warranty. Both are the same price if you know where to look/buy. One has a larger, stronger, engine, wider tilling width, larger tires, and a longer warranty. . . seems like a no-brainer, right? Well, taking all this into consideration I purchased the Husqvarna. Why you ask? Well, the Husqvarna is the only one with a drag-stake and a depth-stake. The Cub Cadet has only a depth-stake. Since most of my tilling will be done with the tines in the forward-rotating mode I chose the tiller with the drag-stake and depth-stake The drag-stake helps to prevent the tiller from "running away" when the tines are rotating forward. So be it. V I got the tiller home, read the owner's manual, verified all nuts and bolts were tightened as they should be and checked to make sure that there was oil in the engine's crankcase as Honda states that they ship their engines with oil already in them. They didn't lie. V I put gasoline into the tank and set the choke and pulled the starter cord twice and it started with a purr. What a sweet sound it is to have relatively quiet running engine. Every start since that time it has started on the first pull Hooray for Honda!! V Actually, I did have a small glitch with the tiller. I put the transmission into gear without any fuss. But then, as I pressed the lever to engage the transmission and move the tiller forward there was a metal-to-metal sound that was only audible when the drive was engaged. I recognized the sound as one that occurs when you have a spinning pulley rubbing against thin metal such as that found on the belt cover. So I investigated. Following the instructions in the owner's manual, I removed the left wheel so I would have easier access to the lower nut. I removed the two screws and the nut holding the belt cover in place. after removing the cover I saw where the transmission pulley had rubbed against the inside of the cover. No big problem. After checking that the transmission pulley was not bent or misaligned with the front pulley, my decision to fix the problem would be to reinstall the belt cover a little further away from the pulley(s). The "play" in the screw holes in the cover allowed me to keep the cover farther away from the pulleys. Also, when tightening the nut on the lower part of the cover I did not tighten it as much as when it was previously installed (at the factory?). I think this actually was the main culprit of the problem. This nut is a type of lock-nut that has a nylon insert that prevents vibration from loosening it. actually, these nuts should be replaced with brand-new ones, as the nylon insert gets deformed on the initial installation and this compromises the locking ability of the nut and might allow the nut to loosen and fall off. So I wiil will replace it with a new lock-nut A.S.A.P. Husqvarna would do well if they would use a bolt in that location that has a built-in shoulder that the cover would go against to prevent the cover from getting too close to or against the transmission pulley. It was an easy fix and the tiller is awesome to use. May 9, 2013
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