Usage


How to use a chainsaw in cold weather

Working with chainsaws during winter can be challenging. Here are some tips on what you can do to stay safe and productive when it gets cold outside.

Felling winter trees

When the temperature drops below zero, even softer tree types such as pine, spruce and some leafy tree species turn hard and brittle. In addition if the tree is covered with snow, you should be extra careful when felling it, since a snow-heavy crown can affect the centre of gravity of the tree. Leave a larger hinge than you normally would, and only fell in the direction of the tree’s natural lean.

Filing during winter

The hardness of frozen wood means that you will have to file the chain more often during the cold season. By using a filing gauge from Husqvarna, you do not have to think about the angle of the cutting teeth to ensure a good result. And since the gauge comes with two different settings – S for soft wood and H for frozen and hard wood – it’s easy to get the depth gauges filed optimally for winter sawing.

Useful chainsaw parts

A cover for the starter housing and a winter air filter are two parts that come in handy for the colder season. By using a winter cover, you eliminate the risk of getting snow in the engine, and a winter air filter prevents the filter getting clogged by ice.

Warm handles and smart cans

With Husqvarna’s personal protective equipment you can stay protected all year round, since they are warm enough to use during winter. For extra warmth, during really cold weather, we offer winter gloves, underwear and a fleece jacket and vest. Husqvarna also offers some chainsaw features and accessories that are especially useful in the cold. Like our XP®G chainsaws with heated handles that keep your hands warm and dry. The carb heating is controlled by a thermostat that switches heat on and off at a certain temperature. And for easy refilling of oil that can be vicious and slow when the temperature drops, you can choose to equip our combi cans with winter oil spouts.

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