August 29, 2013

Hibernating your outdoor power tools

Your outdoor power equipment will benefit from some upkeep before they hibernate for the long winter ahead.

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According to Scott Ride from Husqvarna, the world’s largest producer of outdoor power products, “following a few simple steps before storing your gas-powered tools will ensure a hassle-free start next spring. It will also extend the life of your small gasoline engines.”

These tips from the pros will set you up for nothing but success:

Give it a clean.

The fluid left by cut grass is rather corrosive. That’s why it is extra important to clean gardening tools and mowers, especially before storage. Look for mowers with a water hose connector allowing for easy cleaning of the cutting deck. Just attach the hose, turn on the water and start the engine.

Drain the fuel.

Gasoline left in fuel tanks over the winter will break down, leaving deposits and build-up that will plug up the fuel system.

Take it to the professionals.

For the best results – and prolonged product life – give your products the deluxe, service and maintenance treatment, like the job done at a Husqvarna dealer, says Ride.

Oil it up.

Use an oiled cloth to wipe metal areas and add a couple drops of machine oil on moving parts.

Keep your equipment protected.

Store your lawn equipment indoors if possible. If storing outside protect your equipment in a tool shed or with a tarp.

Recharge the battery.

Remember to fully recharge the battery at some point during the winter months, that way you’ll ensure a flying start to the spring season.

Keep a close eye.

Check your lawn equipment when it is stored. Mice and other vermin like to chew on wires and will nest in your machines.

Soak the trimmer line.

A professional trick for trimmer service is to remove the trimmer line and let it soak in fresh water. By doing so, it will maintain its flexibility, be able to handle more strain and last longer.

Prepare for the snow.

With your summer tools ready for storage, now is the time to get your winter tools ready for use. Fill your snow blower with gas, check and change the oil, and test the spark plugs and tires.